Ol’ Chanty. Richard Livermore


Ol’ Chanty is the new website of the old Chanticleer Magazine, which has now been discontinued. The aim of this website is to publish poetry, essays, short stories, novel excerpts, criticism and what ever else comes our way that we deem worthy of the world’s attention. Ol’ Chanty would like to continue the tradition of Chanticleer Magazine, which called itself  “A Magazine Of Poetry And Ideas – Not Necessarily In That Order.” Therefore Ol’ Chanty will also include a blog (Chatbox) in which the editor – or anyone else – can sound off on any issue which stimilates them to say something interesting – within certain limits of course.

Chanticleer Magazine acquired the reputation of being an against the grain, ‘underground’ magazine which took a certain pride in being different from most other magazines. It received a lot of warm praise from various quarters, as well as some scathing criticism. One reviewer even described it as the most irritating poetry review journal he had surveyed to date. (Kudos indeed!) Ol’ Chanty will do its best to continue this proud and noble tradition.

Chanticleer Press, which used to publish Chanticleer Magazine, now only publishes chapbooks and ‘proper’ books (in limited handmade editions). Details of these publications can be found elsewhere on the website.

Finally, the editor hopes that all who visit these pages enjoy what they read.

Richard Livermore – Editor

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www.northernrenaissance.org


The Journal of the Northern Renaissance (www.northernrenaissance.org) is a new peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to the study of early modern Northern European cultural production. The journal will be alert to the full variety of early modern cultural practice, publishing articles on literature, the visual arts, philosophy, theology, political theory and the scientific technologies of the Northern Renaissance. It places a special emphasis upon interrogating the Southern European derivation of our inherited paradigms and delineating the significance of alternative cultural geographies. Although it is anticipated that attention will converge upon the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the journal is particularly open to attempts both to challenge existing periodizations of the Renaissance in the North and to establish continuities with earlier and later epochs. Continue reading